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SEND Support

Welcome to our SEND Support Learning Page

You will find various resources below to support your child at home.

This is a list of information websites, tips and resources to help you support your children with their additional needs, learning and their self-esteem. Children have varying needs and there is no ‘one-size fits all’ approach. It is quite common for children to have additional needs that span all of these areas, so select the resources that meet the needs of your child, without worrying too much about the label or category they fall under. Everyone has strengths and weaknesses and these SEND strategies will be beneficial to many children.

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Speech and Language Support

Speech and Language and Communication Support

Coronavirus Social Story

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Autism

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Top Tips:

  • Children with Autism need structure and routine. You can help them by using visual timetables to help them see what is happening at each step of the day, so they know in advance what they will be doing next. This will relieve some of their anxiety.
  • You might want to set a specific place for them to do any work or tasks. At school they may have this in the form of a workstation to support their learning (see example in resources section). Each child’s workstation may differ slightly, so you could ask your child to help you set one up that will suit them or that they are already used to.
  • Prepare them for changes in routine.
  • Help your children to recognise and name different emotions and feelings. You can do this by discussing their own emotions, how characters in books and on TV programmes might be feeling and how you yourselves might be feeling. Alongside naming the emotion, describe it and explain why you, they or fictional characters might be feeling like that. You can also play role play guessing games and ask them to name the emotion and say why.
  • Use a 5 point scale to support children in managing their emotions.
  • Use social stories and comic strip cartoons to help children understand different situations and perspectives and address inappropriate behaviour.
  • Have a visual aid to support wanted and unwanted behaviours.
  • Be aware of your child’s sensory needs and support them in managing that need to help them learn e.g. sound reducing earphones if noise is a problem, comfortable clothes, keep the area surrounding the work space clear to avoid over-stimulation etc.
  • Play lots of games with your child to encourage social skills, such as taking turns and winning and losing.

Autism Resources

Autism.org

Families and Parents

Social Stories

5-Point Scale

Social Skills Game

Social Skills Game

How Workstations Work

ADHD

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Top Tips:

  • Offer routines and structure
  • Create a quiet space for them to learn with no distractions.
  • Give them something to fiddle with whilst you are talking to them or you want them to focus. It can also be helpful to let them move around whilst they listen.
  • Ask them to do one task at a time
  • Provide checklists or visual timetables to support organisation.
  • Use timers to help with time management and build in frequent movement breaks.
  • Suggest rather than criticise (children with ADHD can often have low self-esteem)
  • Provide lots of opportunities for exercise and movement.
  • Set up a reward scheme to encourage them and support them with their behaviour.
  • Build on success and help children to pursue more of what they enjoy.
  • Put clear boundaries in place.

ADHD Resources

ADHD Foundation

Self Esteem

Managing ADHD

Joe Wicks

Dyslexia

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Top Tips:

– It is important to encourage children to recognise and pursue the areas in which they excel (do more of what they enjoy) and support them with the areas they find difficult.

-Allow children to use a word processor to complete some written tasks. This highlights spelling errors and offers alternatives. If they can’t type, encourage them to learn, so that they are able to use a Word Processor with more speed and fluency.

-Play games to support memory and retention e.g. pairs, Go Fish

-Enable children to access age related audiobooks to develop a love of reading. Encourage them to share what’s happening in the story and share their excitement, wondering aloud what will happen next. This will also develop their vocabulary and comprehension, without them even realising that they are learning.

-Encourage children to read one page and you read the next page. Read some books to them for pleasure and invite them to read a section if they want to. By developing a love of books and stories children will naturally want to learn how to read, so make the experience as pleasurable as you can.

Dyslexia Resources

Supporting your child at home

8 Working Memory Boosters

Dance Mat

Working Memory

Working Memory

Audible


Pikemere School Alsager
My child has always enjoyed Pikemere School and she wants to stay forever so that shows how well the school does in making the children feel happy and safe. I feel she couldn’t have gone to a better school.
Parent